Film

In Judas and the Black Messiah, Shaka King Tells Fred Hampton's Story in Vivid Color

Filmmaker Shaka King in Brooklyn wearing a Fendi jacket, Winnie sweater, Bando Vintage jeans, Burberry shoes and John Hardy ring. Styling by Oluwabukola Becky Akinyode. Grooming by Jessica Ortiz @ Forward Artists using Hawthorne.
Filmmaker Shaka King in Brooklyn wearing a Fendi jacket, Winnie sweater, Bando Vintage jeans, Burberry shoes and John Hardy ring. Styling by Oluwabukola Becky Akinyode. Grooming by Jessica Ortiz @ Forward Artists using Hawthorne.

More than 50 years after the state-sanctioned murder of Fred Hampton, the story of the slain Black Panther is brought to life, with Shaka King in the director’s chair. In Judas and the Black Messiah, released this month, King takes the audience on a gut-wrenching ride through 126 riveting minutes—death, deceit, love and loss permeate this thrilling crime drama. To preserve the accuracy of the story, however, King chose to involve Hampton’s closest living relatives. “Working with the family was key,” King reveals, in order to give the work an authenticity only firsthand experience could bestow. Although set in the 1960s, the film reflects the inequities African Americans still face today, making it as vital as ever to understand the legacy of Hampton and the Panthers that King has set out to record.

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